List of Non ABA Law Schools

Non ABA Law Schools

non aba law schoolsThe best law schools in the United States are those approved by the American Bar Association (ABA). So why are there non ABA law schools? Well, because each state establishes its own bar admission rules and some states have their own law school accreditation system. Non ABA law schools are most prevalent in California where the system provides for a variety of classes of non ABA law schools, such as state approved and even unaccredited schools whose graduates are eligible to take the bar exam.


Some other states with non ABA law schools are Massachusetts, Georgia Tennessee and Alabama. Actually any state can have non ABA schools, but the real reason there are not more is that not every state will permit graduates of such schools to take their bar examination. And, reason for this is most states recognize the standard of excellence associated with law schools operating under the “ABA Approved” banner.

The ABA has done such an outstanding job of establishing the quality standard that many states feel no need to tinker with the “traditional” system. The ABA approval system works well so why take a chance with schools that do not meet this exacting standard? But some non ABA law schools have been quietly establishing their own high standards, proving that they can meet the challenge of churning out well trained, capable bar candidates—and attorneys. One such online law school is Concord School of Law, a real-life example of the fact that excellence is possible even where the school is a non ABA law school. And Concord is not alone; similar programs are taking on the challenge of bringing online law study into the realm of traditionally accepted legal education.

But the nontraditional model is not a perfect system by far. While all ABA programs must meet at least the minimum standard of quality to maintain their coveted status, non ABA law schools can range from excellent to downright substandard. Yes, that’s right, some schools are absolutely horrible.

So how do you choose the right Non ABA Law School ?

As with any other worthwhile academic undertaking you need to do your homework. You’ll need to visit the various schools or their websites, email your questions, make telephone inquires and check the state education agencies and bar associations for any complaints. In the United States , I happen to think Concord Law Schools is the best in the distance learning class—but, there are a host of others. Take your time and choose wisely.

Take a look at the Law School Bible for a list of nearly every non traditional (and non ABA ) law school in the world.   And don’t forget that there are many foreign law schools as well such as the University of London External Programme and other truly prestigious law programs that have been offering distance learning law degrees for over 150 years. And it is possible to graduate from a foreign law school and take a bar exam in the United States .

Again, for most prospective lawyers in the U.S. , I generally recommend trying to go the traditional course—that is, taking the LSAT exam and getting accepted to a traditional law school. But for those of you who just cannot give up your job and family responsibilities, move to another city or simply cannot afford it, there are alternative pathways you should consider before abandoning your dream of becoming a lawyer.

If you’re considering a non ABA law school you should check out the program thoroughly to be certain you’ll get a good education and, that it will meet your career expectations.Learn how to become a lawyer in spite of artificial barriers – Read The Law School Bible Today!
About the Author
Peter J. Loughlin, J.D., LL.M. achieved his dream of becoming an attorney using only distance learning and online resources. Now he helps others achieve their online college degree dreams at http://www.MaxStudy.com and how to become a lawyer at http://www.LawSchoolBible.com Your dreams are closer than you think.

Permission to reprint this article is granted so long as the entire contents of the “About the Author” box and links are included in the republication.

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